TREATMENTS FOR WARTS, ACNE, PSORIASIS, ECZEMA, ROSACEA, RASHES, AND NAIL FUNGUS

Common skin conditions, such as warts, acne, psoriasis, eczema, rosacea, rashes, and fungus, have various subtypes and can occur on a number of different places on the body. They can affect patients of different ages and genders. Certain ones can be contagious. Some can be treated/managed and not cause any additional issues, while others might.  Because of these factors, it is important to see a board-certified dermatologist and get the correct diagnosis, so that you can receive the most effective treatment.

Warts

wart

Warts: It is common for warts to grow on the hands.

Warts: Overview

Warts are benign (not cancerous) skin growths that appear when a virus infects the top layer of the skin. Viruses that cause warts are called human papillomavirus (HPV). You are more likely to get one of these viruses if you cut or damage your skin in some way.  

Wart viruses are contagious. Warts can spread by contact with the wart or something that touched the wart.

Warts are often skin-colored and feel rough, but they can be dark (brown or gray-black), flat, and smooth.

Acne

Acne: Overview

Acne is the most common skin condition in the United States. Although it’s common, accurate information about acne can be scarce. This can make it difficult to get clearer skin. The information on this site can help you understand acne and how to successfully treat it.

Acne appears when a pore in our skin clogs. This clog begins with dead skin cells. Normally, dead skin cells rise to surface of the pore, and the body sheds the cells. When the body starts to make lots of sebum (see-bum), oil that keeps our skin from drying out, the dead skin cells can stick together inside the pore

Why treat acne?

Myths about acne are as common as the skin problem. One common myth is that you have to let acne run its course.

Dermatologists know that letting acne runs its course is not always the best advice.

Here’s why:

    • Without treatment, dark spots and permanent scars can appear on the skin as acne clears.
    • Treating acne often boosts a person’s self-esteem.
    • Many effective treatments are available.

More women getting acne

Not just teens have acne. A growing number of women have acne in their 30s, 40s, 50s, and beyond. Dermatologists are not sure why this is happening. But dermatologists understand that adult acne can be particularly frustrating.

Psoriasis

psoriasis

Psoriasis (suh-rye-ah-sis) is a condition that causes the body to make new skin cells in days rather than weeks. As these cells pile up on the surface of the skin, you may see thick, scaly patches.

What is psoriasis?

Psoriasis (suh-rye-ah-sis) is a condition that causes the body to make new skin cells in days rather than weeks. As these cells pile up on the surface of the skin, you may see thick, scaly patches.

Plaque psoriasis is the most common type of psoriasis

Those thick, scaly patches that develop on the skin are called plaques (placks). About 80% to 90% of people living with psoriasis get plaques, so they have plaque (plack) psoriasis1.

Plaques can appear anywhere on the skin, but you’re most likely to find them on the:

  • Knees
  • Elbows
  • Lower back
  • Scalp

Plaques tend to vary in size. They may appear on the skin as a single patch or join together to cover a large area of skin.

No matter the size, plaques tend to be itchy. Without treatment, the itch can become intense. Some people notice that their skin stings, burns, or feels painful and tight.

Psoriasis is often a life-long disease 

Most people who get psoriasis have it for life. That’s true no matter what type of psoriasis you have, with one exception. Some children who have guttate (gut-tate) psoriasis see their psoriasis go away.

Because psoriasis tends to be a life-long disease, it helps to learn about it and see a board-certified dermatologist. A bit of knowledge and help from a board-certified dermatologist can give you some control over the psoriasis. By gaining control, you can see clearer (or clear) skin. Gaining control can also help you to feel better, improve your overall health, and prevent the psoriasis from worsening.

Eczema

What is eczema?

Eczema is a word that means irritated skin. Doctors don’t really know why some kids and adults get eczema, and others don’t. They think it might happen for a bunch of reasons:

  • Family: If your mom, dad, brothers, or sisters have eczema, you might get it too.
  • Asthma and allergies: If you have asthma (a disease that can make it hard to breathe) or allergies (when your immune system tries to protect you from normal things that aren’t hurting you), you’re more likely to get eczema.
  • Where you live: Eczema is more common in cities, polluted areas and in the northern part of the world.

When you have eczema, it means your immune system is working too hard. Your immune system usually is good, because it tries to protect you from bad stuff like infections and diseases. For some reason, when you have eczema, your immune system kind of goes crazy. So that makes your skin overreact to something and get all itchy and rashy. Weird, huh?

If you have eczema, you might not itch all the time. It’s sort of like eczema goes to sleep. Certain things wake it up and make you start itching. These things are called triggers and you should try to avoid them if you can, especially if you’ve noticed that they make your skin itchy.

Common triggers are:

  • Animal dander and saliva (when a pet licks you).
  • Scratchy clothes (such as wool).
  • Sweating a lot.
  • Soaps.
  • Household cleaning products.
  • Fruit juices.
  • Dust.
  • A cough, cold, or the flu.

Rosacea

Rosacea: Overview

Rosacea (rose-AY-sha) is a common skin disease. It often begins with a tendency to blush or flush more easily than other people.

The redness can slowly spread beyond the nose and cheeks to the forehead and chin. Even the ears, chest, and back can be red all the time.

Rosacea can cause more than redness. There are so many signs and symptoms that rosacea has four subtypes:

  1. Erythematotelangiectatic rosacea: Redness, flushing, visible blood vessels.
  2. Papulopustular rosacea: Redness, swelling, and acne-like breakouts.
  3. Phymatous rosacea: Skin thickens and has a bumpy texture.
  4. Ocular rosacea: Eyes red and irritated, eyelids can be swollen, and person may have what looks like a sty.  

With time, people who have rosacea often see permanent redness in the center of their face.

Famous faces of rosacea

If you are living with rosacea, you are in good company. Some famous people have struggled with rosacea:

  • Bill Clinton.
  • Diana, Princess of Wales.
  • W.C. Fields (a film star in the 1920s and 1930s).

Fungus

fungus
Nail fungus causes changes to the infected nails. You may see white spots or a change in the nail’s color. Other signs include debris under the nail and thickening nails.
It’s easy to get a fungal nail infection. If you have a fungal infection on your foot, the fungus can spread to one or more of your nails. This is quite common.

You can also catch a fungal nail infection in a warm, moist place like a pool deck or locker room. If someone else has a fungal infection and walked barefoot there, all you have to do is walk barefoot in the same area.

Having wet nails for a long time can also lead to nail fungus. Some people develop it when they wear the same pair of sweaty shoes or boots every day. Fingernails that are wet for hours at a time due to a job or hobby are also susceptible.

What you see on infected nails will vary with the type of fungus causing the infection.

Most people see some nail discoloration. The nail may have a white spot. Some nails turn yellow, brown, or green. As the infection worsens, infected nails can thicken, lift up from the finger or toe, or crumble. Some nails become thinner.


Treatment is important. It can prevent the infection from causing more damage to your nails.


If you have diabetes or a weakened immune system, treatment is especially important. After getting a fungal nail infection, people who have diabetes have an increased risk of developing sores that do not heal. Sores that do not heal can lead to a serious health problem. It’s important to see a dermatologist (or other doctor) at the first sign of a nail problem. A dermatologist can tell you whether you have a nail infection or something else.

Early diagnosis and treatment are recommended for everyone who has nail fungus. Caught early and treated, a fungal nail infection is likely to clear and you’ll regrow a healthy nail.

Treatment can also prevent the fungus from spreading to other parts of your body and to other people.

Dermatitis

dermatitis

Contact dermatitis: Many health care workers develop an allergy to latex, as did this nurse. Her rash is due to touching her face while wearing latex gloves.

Contact dermatitis: Overview

Almost everyone gets this type of eczema at least once. We get contact dermatitis when something that our skin touches causes a rash. Some rashes happen immediately. Most take time to appear.

Allergic contact dermatitis

Some people have an allergic skin reaction. You have had this type of contact dermatitis if you had a rash caused by:

  • Poison ivy
  • Nickel
  • Makeup you applied once or few times
  • Jewelry you wore for a long time without a reaction, such as a wedding ring
  • Jewelry you wore for only a few hours or days
  • Latex gloves

Irritant contact dermatitis

This type is more common. It develops when something irritates the skin. With enough contact, most things will irritate our skin. A person diagnosed with any of the following has irritant contact dermatitis:

  • Diaper rash
  • Acid burn
  • Dry, cracked hands due to lots of contact with water
  • Irritated skin around the mouth due to lip licking

When a toxic substance touches our skin, the skin is quickly irritated. You’ve had irritant contact dermatitis if your skin reacted to a toxic substance like: 

  • Battery acid
  • Bleach
  • Pepper spray 

You can also develop irritant contact dermatitis when you have lots of contact with less irritating substances like: 

  • Water
  • Foods
  • Soap

People often develop irritant contact dermatitis at work. Beauticians, nurses, bartenders, and others who spend lots of time with wet hands get this. It often starts with dry, cracked hands. In time, the skin on their hands may begin to sting and burn. The skin becomes very tender. Sometimes, the skin itches and bleeds.

When a rash does not clear within a few weeks, you should see a dermatologist.When contact dermatitis develops, treatment is important. It can prevent the contact dermatitis from worsening and help your skin heal.